Thursday, January 17, 2019

RIP …

… Poet Mary Oliver Dies at 83 | Literary Hub. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Three sisters …

… RT’s Marginalia : Anne Bronte — an apology, confession, and promise


I haven’t read Anne’s, but when I read Emily’s in high school I fell in love with her.


Blogging note …

I have to go out shortly. So blogging will resume whenever I get back.

Savory deception …

… Bakery of Lies by Judith Askew : American Life in Poetry. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

They really did dance all night …

… and all day — for days: The Dancing Plague of 1518 – The Public Domain Review. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

In full view of the public, this is the apogee of the choreomania that tormented Strasbourg for a midsummer month in 1518. Also known as the “dancing plague”, it was the most fatal and best documented of the more than ten such contagions which had broken out along the Rhine and Moselle rivers since 1374. Numerous accounts of the bizarre events that unfolded that summer can be found scattered across various contemporary documents and chronicles compiled in the subsequent decades and centuries.

Getting a handle on Saul Bellow …

… James Wolcott reviews ‘The Life of Saul Bellow’ by Zachary Leader — LRB 24 January 2019. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

As monumental as Leader’s investigation is, with its copious documentation and minute reconstruction of such a long, labyrinthine lifespan (just keeping track of the zigzag traffic of Bellow’s girlfriends must have made him dizzy), his manner and approach are modest and self-effacing; his personal piques and objections to Bellow’s personal and professional misdemeanours are mostly kept in a diplomatic pouch, in marked contrast to Atlas’s snorty exasperations. He endeavours to be judiciously fair. But although Leader has avoided Atlas’s egregious attitudinising, he runs afoul of several hazards that bog him and the impatient reader (me, pumping the accelerator) in extensive tracts of whichy thickets. Leader might have profited from heeding a couple of cautionary flags that were raised by someone in the know.

Poetry and life …

… Life-saving prosody | The greatness of Avrom Sutzkever. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In 1943 Sutzkever and his wife Freydke, escaping from the Vilna Ghetto, went into hiding in the forests where he fought with a Jewish unit of the partisan resistance. “Kol Nidre”, his long, harrowing Holocaust poem of that year, had brought him to the attention of the Jewish anti-Fascist Committee in Moscow, who sent a plane to rescue them. In order to reach the plane, the couple had to negotiate a minefield. Sutzkever solved the problem by crossing it in metre. “Sometimes I walked in anapaests, sometimes in amphibrachs.” “Each section of the minefield”, explains his friend, the poet Dory Manor, “had its own rhythm, an entire prosody of life-saving.”

Something to think on …

Women do not find it difficult nowadays to behave like men, but they often find it extremely difficult to behave like gentlemen.
— Compton Mackenzie, born on this date in 1883

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Hmm …

 Paul Davis On Crime: Chinese Spies, Thieves And Hackers: My Piece On Two Cases That Expose China's Campaign To Steal America's Trade Secrets.



… there's more here.

Watch the trailer …

… Mackenzie’s Secret Novel Tease on Vimeo.

Affluence …

… Nicolas Maduro raises minimum wage in Venezuela to $6 per month - UPI.com.

I don’t imagine this will garner much criticism in these parts because, you know, socialism.

Good …

… Oscar endorsement for Women of the Gulag: “To go through such suffering without going mad is a spiritual feat.” | The Book Haven.

Anniversary …

… RT’s Marginalia : Don Quixote — on the road with a kindred spirit.

Poetry and faith …

 Mary Karr’s Poems of Pity and Praise - The Kenyon Review. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Together at last …

 Aquarium of Vulcan: Sir Thomas Browne and Japan. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



Browne's philosophical discourse assists the youthful’s protagonist’s intellectual development, for during his meditation upon it, he witnesses a child’s funeral. The combination of Browne's stoical prose and child's funeral awakens in the dreaming student an acute awareness of his own mortality. Here's the full, relevant text, including a passage in which Browne's literary voice is likened to the lingering reverberation of a giant temple bell sounding faintly throughout the centuries, a particularly original homage.

Something to think on …

Poetry operates by hints and dark suggestions. It is full of secrets and hidden formulae, like a witch's brew.
— Anthony Hecht, born on this date in 1923

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Listen in …

… The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale: James Daunt on the Turnaround at Waterstones.

Anniversary …

 RT’s Marginalia : Salem Witch Trials — fasting and repentance.

So long, Dolly…

… The Legendary Carol Channing Dies at 97.

Ah, yes …

… Almanac: Phyllis McGinley on tolerance | About Last Night.

Here is In Praise of Diversity.

They didn't just ban books …

… they also stole them: The Hunt for the Nazi Loot Still Sitting on Library Shelves. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)
Given the scope of the looting, the task ahead remains mountainous. In Berlin, for example, at the Central and Regional Library, almost a third of the 3.5 million books are suspected to have been looted by the Nazis, according to Sebastian Finsterwalder, a provenance researcher there.

The new New Class …

… Class warfare between workers and elites explains Trump-era conflicts. 
The postwar era saw the creation of international institutions ranging from NATO to the United Nations to the World Bank, along with a proliferation of think tanks and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to accompany them. It saw the vast expansion of higher education in the United States, and the transformation of academic degrees into something close to must-haves for the upper-middle class. It saw a great expansion of power on the part of media organizations, and on the part of government bureaucrats and lobbyists, both of whose numbers increased enormously.

And the winner is …

… 'A star is born': TS Eliot prize goes to Hannah Sullivan's debut | Books | The Guardian. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Sullivan’s debut is made up of three lengthy poems: You, Very Young in New York, which explores the lives of various young people, all united by their cynicism and their uncertainty, making their way through unfulfilling relationships and work in the city; Repeat Until Time is an exploration of revision in art and form, Sullivan’s PhD subject; the third, The Sandpit After Rain explores connections between the birth of her baby and the death of her father.

Turns out he could boogie …

… The Ancient Greek rebel leader who saw Socrates solo-dancing | Aeon Essays. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In Xenophon’s Symposium, Socrates asks the Phoenician dance-master to show him some dance moves. Everyone laughs: what will you do with dance moves, Socrates? He replies: ‘I’ll dance, by God!

Something to think on …

Moons and years pass by and are gone forever, but a beautiful moment shimmers through life a ray of light.
— Franz Grillparzer, born on this date in 1791

Listen in…

… Episode 303 – Peter Kuper – The Virtual Memories Show.

“Art has been my saving grace, in terms of having an outlet so I’m not just having today’s news run around in my head and make me scream.”

A fresh understanding …

… In the stars: an epiphany story | National Catholic Reporter. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

 To say that the stars influence the minutia of your life is to say that each ephemeral moment and contingency is pulsing with reality, a granular instance of an immortal cosmos.

Overview …

… Complete Works Evelyn Waugh, Personal Writings, CWEW. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

So far the books retail at about £65 (or £100 for the blue volume). What else could one get for about £3,000 that would represent better value? (Obviously I'm talking about the full set, once it's available.)

Monday, January 14, 2019

Second World War...

...Looted literature, books, and manuscripts

Not those snowflakes …

… the real ones: RT’s Marginalia : Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and “Snow-Flakes”.

Hmm …

… ‘The gilets jaunes are unstoppable’ - spiked.

One illustration of this cultural divide is that most modern, progressive social movements and protests are quickly endorsed by celebrities, actors, the media and the intellectuals. But none of them approve of the gilets jaunes. Their emergence has caused a kind of psychological shock to the cultural establishment. It is exactly the same shock that the British elites experienced with the Brexit vote and that they are still experiencing now, three years later.


Then there's this: French riot police are now using semi-automatic weapons with live ammunition against Yellow Vest protestors as Macron’s law and order crisis spirals.

Blogging note

I have to head out to a doctor's appointment (just routine — I hope). Then I have some other things to do. Blogging will resume sometime later on.

In case you wondered …

… BOOK REVIEW: How one of Al Capone's 'boy wonders' lived and died
- Washington Times
.

Fruitful dialogue …

… The Habit of Being a Catholic Writer | The Russell Kirk Center. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

They both rejected a Catholicism devoid of imagination, or what we might call “catholic kitsch.” But the problem of being a Catholic novelist was on their minds. In one of the early letters, O’Connor voiced this concern to Gordon: “I used to be concerned with writing a ‘Catholic’ novel and all that but I think now I was only occupying myself with fancy problems. If you are a Catholic you know so well what you believe, that you can forget about it and get on with the business of making the novel work.” O’Connor did not turn the Catholic faith into an ideology or an -ism, but treated it as a lived reality, a mystery. This is part of the reason, surely, that she has achieved her place in the American literary canon. She didn’t utilize the doctrines of the church and proceed to preach from the pulpit. She wasn’t a false prophet like many of her characters.

Vintage Q&A …

… Paris Review - Joyce Cary, The Art of Fiction No. 7.

Something to think on …

We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are.
— Anaïs Nin, who died on this date in 1977

The bastards …

… RT’s Marginalia : British try to steal sheep from colonists — January 13.

Ch-ch-changes …

… The Millions Was the Last Great Indie Book Blog. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

See also: Suburban malaise ...

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Let’s hope …

Will Women of the Gulag get an Oscar next month? Please vote yes. Putin won’t like it. | The Book Haven.

According to Paul, the film “drives home the point that Russia has yet to come to terms with the Gulag and the Great Terror. Consider the striking images of a Stalin look-alike selling photos on Red Square and older men and women sobbing at Stalin’s burial place. There has never been a big event, like Nuremberg or the Truth Commission in South Africa, that wipes the slate clean.  The Russian President Vladimir Putincannot deny that the Gulag happened, but he needs the Russian people to want a leader with a firm hand. The strategy of admitting Stalin’s ‘harshness’ while emphasizing his presumed contributions has paid off. The Russian people name Stalin as the most significant figure in history!”

Resolution and independence …

… RT’s Marginalia : British try to steal sheep from colonists — January 13.

Appreciation …

… ‘She was a shining light in the world of letters’ – John Banville pays tribute to critic Eileen Battersby | Books | The Guardian. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Poetry live …

Inquirer reviews …

… Jodi Picoult’s ‘Spark of Light’: Tackling a divisive social issue with plot twists and a point of view.

… B.A. Shapiro’s 'Collector’s Apprentice’: A historical suspense novel involving Albert C. Barnes and the art world.

… Michael Beschloss’ ‘Presidents of War’: The dangers of ‘the power invested in me’.

… Miriam Parker’s ‘Shortest Way Home’: A romance as fizzy as champagne.

Sorely missed …

 Auberon Waugh “Celebrated” in New Book | The Evelyn Waugh Society. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



He would have a field day with today's political mediocrities.

Remembering …

… RT’s Marginalia : Edmund Spenser — a poem and anniversary.

Q&A …

 A Conversation with Dana Gioia - Image Journal. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

I wasn’t drawn to poetry or opera because of their popularity. It was their beauty and excitement that drew me. Of course, I would like these arts to have larger audiences, but the value of an art isn’t in the size of its audience. It’s in the truth and splendor of its existence.

Something to think on …

The Christian is like the ripening corn; the riper he grows the more lowly he bends his head.
— A. B. Guthrie, Jr., born on this date in 1901

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Will to the rescue …

… RT’s Marginalia : Shakespeare — flabbergasted again after 60 years.

Gauging absence …

… Asymmetry by Adam Zagajewski | World Literature Today. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

These poems know that they are governed by a tangled logic. They also, crucially, realize that human life is not always governed by any perceptible logic and do not try to explain the inexplicable to their readers. 

Call a lawyer …

… The trial of Peter Boghossian | Spectator USA. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Ideologically biased scholarship which relies on shoddy methods, unevidenced ‘theory’ and ethics that are dependent on one’s gender, racial and sexual identity abound within these fields and they undermine both scholarship and social justice. One cannot expect a philosopher who has devoted his career to evidence-based epistemology and liberal ethics to ignore this alarming threat to both.

A wise man …

… Schall at 91—an Interim Report - The Catholic Thing. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



Somehow, I have found the so-called “Jesus Prayer,’ to be most helpful – “Jesus, Son of the Eternal Father, have mercy on me, a sinner.” One’s life is often filled with prayers for others, and rightly so. But in the lonely hours when you cannot sleep or get comfortable or figure out what it is all about, you realize that you too are now the locus of the reality that is you.
I, too, find the Jesus Prayer a great help.

Reappraisal …

… How John Singer Sargent made a scene | Art and design | The Guardian. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

The forthcoming exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery…  makes the case for a show that would reveal all of Sargent’s range – not only the many magnificent portraits on display in this exhibition, but also his landscapes, watercolours, sketches and murals, as well as the extraordinary Gassed, the colossal late painting of soldiers blinded on the western front that anticipates “proletarian realism”.
John Singer Sargent was born on this date in 1856.

Dreamt or dreaming?

… Zealotry of Guerin: The Punishment of Luxury (Giovanni Segantini), Sonnet #439.

Something to think on …

I would rather be ashes than dust.
— Jack London, born on this date in 1876

Friday, January 11, 2019

Blogging note …

I have to be out and about again. Blogging will resume later on.

So much for the bird-brain put-down …

… For boy budgies, brains beat brawn in the mating game | Cosmos.

Poetry and truth …

 RT’s Marginalia : Emily Dickinson on time, trouble, and suffering.

Contemporary journalism …

… NBC New York on Twitter: "Police say a New Jersey man fought off an unwanted house visitor by using the suspect’s own gun, ultimately killing him https://t.co/1WHJSynccb".

Well, why not?

… “O Uommibatto”: How the Pre-Raphaelites Became Obsessed with the Wombat – The Public Domain Review. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Home’s wombat, a male, was in fact caught by George Bass, probably on King Island, where we know Bass and his companions shot several other specimens. Once provoked, this particular wombat put up a splendid struggle, tearing strips off Bass’s coat sleeves and making loud “whizzing” noises. Evidently he took ages to calm down. Bass kept him alive, looked after him well, and sent him to England. There, in London, he lived in what Home described as “a domesticated state for two years”. The following description is no less charming today than it must have been for English scientific readers nearly two centuries ago.

Drawing and memory …

… Drawing Helps Us Remember Details Better Than Writing or Taking Photos, a New Study Shows | artnet News. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Look and ponder …

… Photography Life in acute focus | Morning Star. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Recommended …

… Must-Read Poetry: January 2019 - The Millions. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Photographs of empire …

… Over 6,000 Ottoman-Era Photographs Now Available Online. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Useful and entertaining …

… Dreyer’s English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style by Benjamin Dreyer, reviewed by Beth Spencer - Beth Spencer. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Unpersoning …

… [Easy Chair] Cruel and Unusual Punishment | Harper's Magazine. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

… in the instances we’re examining here, the distributor makes that decision for us. As if we need to be protected. (Or the distributor needs to protect itself—from association with sin. Clearly the real motivation here is to appear immaculate.) In truth, we’re being punished too, along with the alleged perpetrators. We’ve been robbed of a halfway watchable season of Transparent that includes Jeffrey Tambor. I wanted to see the new Louis C.K. movie. But presumptuously, patronizingly, I’m not allowed. Who’s really deprived when we can’t access The Best of A Prairie Home Companion? What does that accomplish? In ditching the revival of Roseanne, we’ve lost the one program that exhibited the kind of diversity of which this country is starved: it sponsored a real live Trump supporter. After much soul searching, I can’t see who benefits if I throw away Mario Batali’s recipe for lemon tart.

Something to think on …

I myself believe that the evidence for God lies primarily in inner personal experiences.
— William James, born on this date in 1842

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Loss …

… First Known When Lost: Companion.

Taking note …

… RT’s Marginalia : Stephen Ambrose — birthday and books.

Lovely …

… Psalm | Dorianne Laux. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Today is Dorianne Laux’s birthday.

Mark thy calendar …


Reading Gorbachev in Moscow

An interesting piece on meeting your historical subject...

Gauging the vitriol …

… Is Anna Gaca the Worst Writer Ever? – Reluctant Habits

Every band has an off gig. Every person has an off day. There isn’t a human being walking this earth who hasn’t made a mistake. And if you’re the kind of person who is just waiting for someone you despise to screw up, what does this say about you? Wouldn’t that time be better spent creating or making something? Or perhaps basking in culture that you enjoy or hanging out with friends that you do like?

The rest is history …

… When Leo Fender Asked Les Paul to Endorse the Telecaster | Reverb News. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

The joke’s on us …

… Pranked by the Cross - The Catholic Thing. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Politics and religion …

… RT’s Marginalia : Archbishop of Canterbury beheaded.

Mastery …

… That Formal Feeling | by Elisa Gabbert | The New York Review of Books. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Stallings may be so immersed in form that her thoughts arrive already dressed in it—or maybe they arrive formless, but she so enjoys the game of arranging those thoughts into patterns of meter and rhyme that almost any occasion will do. She moves freely between the mythic and the quotidian, between epic and modest scales—one poem, “Lost and Found,” begins with a search for a misplaced fragment of toy (“Some vital Lego brick or puzzle piece”) and ends up traveling to a Valley of Lost Things set not in Oz but on the moon. Others remain firmly domestic; the muse might arrive while the speaker reseasons a cast-iron skillet (as in “Cast Irony”) or picks lice or glitter (two separate poems, “Lice” and “Glitter”) from a daughter’s hair.

Treasure hunt …

… Litanies of Reclamation:A Review of The Lost Words by Sally Thomas. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In The Lost Words, Macfarlane and Morris aim to restore an imaginative vision of the natural world. Macfarlane might have contented himself with simply listing and defining those words lost to the dictionary, pairing them with Morris’s breathtaking illustrations. An illustrated nature dictionary would have been, in itself, a magical-enough book. But in making each “lost word” a poem, Macfarlane has revived not only the word itself, but language as an experience. The book’s subtitle labels it “A Spell Book,” and its poems are incantatory, each one a litany of reclamation.

Let us hope …

… On Poetry: A wish for New Year: Less fear, more safety | Local News | record-eagle.com. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Listen in …

… Episode 302 – Jerome Charyn – The Virtual Memories Show.

“In most historical novels, you’re dealing with events, and I’m really dealing with trauma and wounds.”

Wonderful …

… The House Dog's Grave By Robinson Jeffers: An Animal Rights Poem from All-Creatures.org.

Something to think on …

Poetry is not a civilizer, rather the reverse, for great poetry appeals to the most primitive instincts.
— Robinson Jeffers, born on this date in 1887

And the winner is …

… Benford Wins 2019 Heinlein Award – Locus Online.

Wednesday, January 09, 2019

Blogger woes …

… RT’s Marginalia : Blogging Note — The beginning of the end.

Quite a guy, actually …

… The Ministry of Mr. Rogers | by Robert Sullivan | The New York Review of Books. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Now, fifty years after the first episode aired, we are still modulating through versions of Fred Rogers. Children of a certain age know him as the guy in the suit who switched into a cardigan at each show’s start, singing, “Won’t you be my neighbor?” Off-screen Rogers was hard to know, or difficult to categorize. He was a lifelong teetotaler who owned a stake in Vegetarian Times and used salty language with his own kids, though only in the puppet voice of Lady Elaine Fairchilde. Coworkers remember Rogers as both zany—dancing across the set with an inflatable sex doll they had hid in his closet—and imperious, as when he reprimanded an actor who kindly suggested to Henrietta Pussycat that she not cry, something Rogers would never suggest to a child.

The road to martyrdom …

… RT’s Marginalia : Joan of Arc -- beginning of the end.

Kudos …

 In Praise of Les Murray - Quadrant Online. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Kindred spirits …

 A Treasure Trove of Labyrinths | Lapham’s Quarterly. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In the letters of Kenner and Davenport, as in those of artists and intellectuals throughout history, we meet first-draft people and are introduced to their first-draft ideas. But these shards of insight are surrounded by “eloquent absences” and “ghosts unfulfilled,” using Kenner’s phrasing: “the accessible world a domain of ghosts and shadows and half-men.”

Indeed …

… Poetry Resources: The Norton Book of Light Verse | Form in Formless Times. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Something to think on …

It's not possible to search for God using the methods of a detective... There is no way. You can only wait till God's axe severs your roots: then you will understand that you are here only through a miracle, and you will remain fixed forever in wonderment and equilibrium.
— Karel Čapek, born on this date in 1890

Tuesday, January 08, 2019

Inquirer reviews …

… Liane Moriarty returns with another engrossing star-maker, ‘Nine Perfect Strangers’.

… Diane Sahms-Guarnieri’s ‘Handheld Mirror’: Well-chosen words as emotional abstract art.

… ’Justice Under the Rubble’: The Salvation Army thrift store collapse and its human and legal aftermath.

Blogging note …

I will be away from my desk for most of the rest of the day. So blogging will resume later on.

Take your pick …

… Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second.

…  Deep Pacific Waters Are Cooling Down Due To Centuries-Ago Little Ice Age, New Study Suggests.

Listen in …

… The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale: Current CEO Stephen Page in dialogue with Geoffrey Faber.

In this corner …

… RT’s Marginalia : God & Empire: Jesus Against Rome, Then and Now by John Dominic Crossan.

The grace of life as lived …

Spotlight: Midge Goldberg | Light. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Goldberg indelibly celebrates the ordinary in poems such as “Pan,” not about the mythic deity but about trying to find a twenty-inch baking pan with a high rim, suitable for making a chicken feeder. She has also given us poems on such subjects as hats, a sump pump, a coffeepot, and an ice tray …

Hmm …

… A note on character in politics by James Piereson | The New Criterion. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

On Machiavelli and contemporary political discourse.

Thinking soundly …

… Taleb the Philosopher by Joshua P. Hochschild | Articles | First Things. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Taleb is an original philosopher, not a historian of ideas, and it would be as churlish to fixate on the errors in his interpretation of Aristotelian causality or Platonic political theory as to correct his occasional sloppiness in describing Christian doctrine. Taleb is bold and takes risks. Incidental errors should be recognized for what they are: inadvertent distractions that may be refined away with time.

Something to think on …

There is only one world; the world pressing against you at this minute. There is only one minute in which you are alive; this minute here and now. The only way to live is by accepting each minute as an unrepeatable miracle.
— Storm Jameson born on this date in 1891

Monday, January 07, 2019

The art of holiness …

… Wendy Beckett -- Turning to Jesus with Sister Wendy Beckett | National Review.

Bardic wisdom …

… RT’s Marginalia : Shakespeare — wisdom and promise.

No mere literary critic …

 Lionel Trilling “Life in Culture”: Critic’s Letters Reveal Brilliant Moralist, Literary Mind | National Review. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Trilling’s own teachers, Erskine (a serious Anglican), Mark Van Doren (later a colleague), and Arnold, had conveyed to him a sense that language and literature must be suffused with or at least oriented toward ethics, and his dissent from the exaltation of literary and artistic modernism was not simplistic, hasty, petulant, or merely temperamental: It was the fruit of a lifetime disposition to virtue. He loved to recount how pleased he was with a student who called George Orwell “a virtuous man,” and the fact is that in a madly extreme “age of enormity” he tried to be such a man himself, without much help from the traditional props and sources of monotheistic religion or the philosophical idealism of Plato, Spinoza, or Kant. If his faith in Freud was misplaced, as I believe it was, his steady decency and intellectual discrimination were no less real. Many a believer has been better than his god.


Since mention is made in this piece of "Sam Tanenhaus’s great biography of [Whittaker] Chambers," I thought I would link to my review of it.

Sad anniversary …

… Anecdotal Evidence: `Wave From the Fat Book Again'. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



John Berryman committed suicide on this date in 1972 by jumping off the Washington Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis. I visited the site once while driving through Minneapolis. Oddly enough, I live right down the street from Philadelphia's Washington Avenue.
One poem in his last collection, Delusions, Etc., seems to me have prefigured his end:


He Resigns

                   Age, and the deaths, and the ghosts.
                        Her having gone away
                        in spirit from me. Hosts
                        of regrets come and find me empty.

                        I don’t feel this will change.
                        I don’t want anything
                        or person, familiar or strange.
                        I don’t think I will sing

                        anymore just now,
                        or ever. I must start
                        to sit with a blind brow
                        above an empty heart.

Anniversary …

Francis Poulenc was born on this date in 1899.

Something to think on …

The sinner is at the heart of Christianity. No one is as competent as the sinner in matters of Christianity. No one, except a saint.
— Charles Péguy, born on this date 1873

Sunday, January 06, 2019

RIP …

 Language Log —  Stanley Insler, 1937-2019. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Revisiting a classic …

… Scoop (Modern Library #75) – Reluctant Habits.

In case you wondered …

… Mongolian Heavy Metal Band Gets Millions Of YouTube Views : Goats and Soda : NPR. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

"Mongolians are not just taking elements from Western music and just copying and pasting," says Stokes. Instead, they're using some of these elements and making their own authentic music.
"So it's not rock music performed by Mongolians. It's Mongolian rock music," she says.
It's also pretty damn good.

The great perhaps …

… RT’s Marginalia : Emily Dickinson on death and resurrection.

Con artist argot …

… David Maurer, the Dean of Criminal Language | CrimeReads. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

A con man, Maurer writes, “must be able to make anyone like him, confide in him, trust him.” It’s theater of the miniature, designed to attract a would-be mark, reel them in, hook them on the line, and then, when it’s clear the mark will pay up, blowing them off after the money disappears.

Trend setter …

 The biz side of Les Miz: it was the first international book launch in publishing history | The Book Haven.

Time as preceived …

… The red borders of time | Brandywine Books.

Tales grounded in experience …

… The Doctor as Moralist | The Russell Kirk Center. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



[Dalymple's] fictions brush up against the hard edge of a lived reality, striking a still pose halfway between fairy tale and morality play.

Something to think on …

Nothing is more limiting than a closed circle of acquaintanceship where every avenue of conversation has been explored and social exchanges are fixed in a known routine.
— A. J. Cronin, who died on this date in 1981

Saturday, January 05, 2019

RIP …

… Jay Searcy, former Inquirer sports editor, dies at 84.

I worked under Jay for a couple of years. As the obit indicates, he was a true gentleman and a first-rate journalist.

Quite likely …

… America’s most underrated poet? Maybe so… | The Book Haven.

Q&A …

… Stitched Together: Krista Franklin Discusses “Under the Knife”. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

… it turned into an artist book after I got to a point where I couldn’t write any more. I took the book to the cutting floor and transformed it. I have a deep love for artist books, and have made a few. This one is special, though, because it’s been shaped in collaboration in design with the Candor Arts team.

Natural wisdom …

… Winter Trees by William Carlos Williams | Poetry Foundation. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Tax dollars at work …

… The Poetry Office: A Photo Essay | Beltway Poetry Quarterly.

See also:  U.S. Poets Laureate Issue, Part II.

(Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)


Poetry and poets …

… Two Iconic Russian Poets, the Couch They Shared, and Me | Literary Hub. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

A tender tribute …

… RT’s Marginalia : Emily Dickinson — a letter to the world.

Q&A …

… Brian Moore: ‘my real strength is that I am a truthful writer. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

I suppose I’m writing for a reader like myself. And if I am to be moved by experimental writing, it has got to be magnificent, it’s got to be as virtuoso as Ulysses or as interesting as Borges. To my mind one cannot write truly experimental books unless they are masterpieces. So that one’s chance of failure is enormous. 

The old days …

… Zealotry of Guerin: Pallas and the Centaur (Botticelli), Sonnet #438.

Hear, hear …

… Leave the Strand Alone! Iconic Bookstore Owner Pleads With NYC: Don't Landmark My Property - Reason.com.

Good point …

… Michael Walsh on Twitter: "History is politically incorrect. That’s why it’s not taught any more."

In case you wondered …

… Where to Download All the Books That Just Entered the Public Domain. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Mark thy calendar …

… All But True feat. Anjali Mitter Duva & Janet Mason | Penn Book Center. (Hat tip, Doug Gordon.)

Sign up …

MAKING POEMS THAT LAST – January – February   2019 



A POETRY WORKSHOP WITH LEONARD GONTAREK



ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED / Sign Up In Advance 


Reserve a place in the class via: gontarek9@earthlink.net


While there’s no guarantee you’ll become the next Robert Frost, with the guidance of award-winning, prolific poet Leonard Gontarek, it’s at least a possibility. Encouraging students to explore as many avenues as possible and remove themselves from their work, he’ll help you find—then strengthen—your style and voice.

                                Philadelphia Weekly, Nicole Finkbiner




The workshop will include discussions of contemporary and international 
poetry, translation, the students’ poetry, and the realities of publishing poetry.

Narrative, persona, political, homage, and confessional poetry will be 
covered with a focus on what makes a poet’s voice original and their own.

Specific direction and assignments will be given, with attention
to the basic elements and forms of poetry.

Through invention students will build more accurate and textured work.

The workshop will be presented in eight 2-hour classes,
All Saturdays, 11:00 – 1:00 PM: January 5, 12, 19, 26, February 2, 9, 16, 23.                                                 
The cost is 192 dollars for 8 classes.
24 dollars per class. You may pay as you go.     Sign up in advance.

Please contact Leonard Gontarek with interest: gontarek9@earthlink.net,
215.808.9507 – Independent workshops and manuscript editing available.

Location: 4221 Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia.



Leonard poems here:


http://rasputinpoetry.blogspot.com/2018/04/leonard-gontarek-withstands-her.html





Leonard Gontarek is the author of six books of poems:
St. Genevieve Watching Over Paris, Van Morrison Can’t Find His Feet,
Zen For Beginners, Déjà Vu Diner, He Looked Beyond My Faults
and Saw My Needs, and Take Your Hand Out of My Pocket, Shiva 
(Hanging Loose Press, 2016) – Available from Small Press Distribution & Amazon.

His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Field, Poet Lore,
Verse, Handsome, Fence, Blackbird, The Awl, Poetry Northwest, 
and in the anthologies, The Best American Poetry, The Working Poet,
and Joyful Noise: American Spiritual Poetry. He has received five
Pushcart Prize nominations and twice received poetry fellowships 
from the Pennsylvania Council On The Arts.
He was the 2011 Philadelphia Literary Death Match Champion.

He coordinates The Philadelphia Poetry Festival, Peace/Works: Poetry Readings
for Peace, and the Green Line Café Reading and Interview Series.
Since 2006 he has conducted 1000 poetry workshops in venues including,
The Moonstone Arts Center, Musehouse, The Kelly Writers House,
University City Arts League, Free Library of Philadelphia, 
Mad Poets Society, Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnership,
and a weekly Saturday workshop from his home in West Philadelphia.

In 2014 he created the first Philly Poetry Day. He was recipient of
the Philadelphia Writers Conference Community Service Award in 2014.
In 2015, his poem, 37 Photos From The Bridge, was a Poetry winner for the Big Bridges 
MotionPoems project and the basis for the winning film from the Big Bridges poetry
film contest sponsored by MotionPoems and the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis.
He is Poetry Consultant for the Walt Whitman At 200: Art And Democracy project.

Something to think on …

Poetry is not a matter of feelings, it is a matter of language. It is language which creates feelings.
— Umberto Eco, born on this date in 1932

Friday, January 04, 2019

In case you wondered …

… The best theater of 2018 | About Last Night.

Ouch …

… Women's Magazines Dying? Good Riddance! | Dr. Helen

These magazines used to be entertaining and fun and appeal to a variety of women, now they are all about politics and, frankly, boring even to those who agree with them. And these magazines' main feat seems to have been that they gave highflying media careers to female journalists who served as foot soldiers for the left. Why are they entitled to such privilege?

Blogging note …

I have to be out and about very shortly. So blogging will resume later on.

In memoriam …


John Knox is my step-grandson and the late George Bartholomew was the family cat. He was a fabulous figure and a great American.

Hypersensitivity, I guess …

… Unanswered Text Initiates Unending Cycle of Self-Loathing and Regret.  (Hat tip, Ed Chanpion.)

Perfect simplicity …

… Robert Frost wrote this masterpiece in about 20 minutes; it belongs to all of us now | News | sentinelsource.com. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Anniversary …

 RT’s Marginalia : T. S. Eliot dies on 4 January 1965.

A loving portrait …

… Movie Review: Stan & Ollie - Hit & Run : Reason.com. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Director Jon S. Baird and writer Jeff Pope have made a movie of gratifying simplicity. It's about a pair of decent men who are trying to maintain their dignity in diminishing circumstances, amid the usual trials of sickness and age, and they are so unlike most of the movie characters one customarily encounters in contemporary films that their gentle charm seems exotic. It helps, of course, that they're played by two actors in top form. 

Haiku …



Houseplant silhouette
On green wall. Morning sunlight
Hinting at what's real.

Something to think on …

Some other faculty than the intellect is necessary for the apprehension of reality.
— Henri Bergson, who died on this date in 1941

Thursday, January 03, 2019

An alternative modernity …

… On Being Catholic Modern - The Catholic Thing.

As Chappel tells the story, the Church and faithful intellectuals were at once reconciled to the increasing secularization of the state and dogged in their conviction that social life could be more just and harmonious only if that state heeded the Church’s guidance on fundamental principles.

A classic review …

… Nothing is arbitrary | C. S. Lewis on The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Giving voice to grief …

 … "Our fathers lied": Rudyard Kipling as a war poet | OUPblog. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Embarkation

… RT’s Marginalia : Herman Melville — the voyage begins.

Intriguing, though …

… You’re Not Very Interesting – Reluctant Habits.

A sort of protection …

… Channeling The Pain Of Depression Into Photography, And Finding You Are Not Alone : The Picture Show : NPR. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

School days …

… The Microscopes | The Nation. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Departure and arrival…

… “Advent,” by Heather Christle | The New Yorker. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Inquirer reviews …

…  New series from J.R. Ward and Grace Draven, and a pair of holiday stories set in England.

… ‘How Do We Look’ by Mary Beard: A refreshing tour of world art, touching God and humanity.

A gathering of samplers …

 The Best American Poetry 2018 review - The Washington Post. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)



The question posed in the headline —How do you define authenticity? — brings to mind something said by Thomas à Kempis: "I would rather feel compunction than be able to define it."

And now for something completely different …

(Hat tip, Paul Davis.)

The wonder of everydayness …

… We Still Live Within the Mediated, Alienated World of “The Moviegoer” | The New Yorker. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Percy was a late starter as a novelist, and Binx Bolling is late coming of age, but Percy’s novel of Binx’s coming of age was ahead of its time. With its slack and offhand protagonist, its present-tense narration, its effortless mix of informal speech, images from popular culture, and frank ruminations on the meaning of life, “The Moviegoer” is, in my estimation, the first work of what we call contemporary American fiction, the earliest novel to render a set of circumstances and an outlook that still feel recognizably ours.

Birthday …

… RT’s Marginalia : Tolkien and me.




Something to think on …

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— J. R. R. Tolkien, born on this date in 1892

Wednesday, January 02, 2019

Hometown …

… RT’s Marginalia : KDKA in Pittsburgh — another first.

Sounds good …

… Best New Year’s resolution for 2019 – from the third monkey on Noah’s Ark | The Book Haven.

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes …

… The Avant-Garde's Slide into Irrelevance - Quillette.

In the first two decades of the twenty-first century, independent ateliers—traditional-style art schools with a focus upon skill based training—flourished as alternatives to avant-gardist University art schools and colleges, and are now accredited as legitimate institutions where students may learn studio techniques that lead to employment as fine artists and in the movie, animation, and video game industries.