Monday, March 30, 2015

Hmm …

… Cynthia Ozick NY Times Piece on Young Writers Misses the Economics | The New Republic. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



I had an editing job the day after I left college. It paid well, too. Then, I bopped around for quite a few years writing, editing, and doing anything else necessary to pay the bills. (Those other jobs taught me much of value I couldn't have learned elsewhere.) I suspect a lot of young writers today are doing much the same thing.

Posthumous life …

… New Elmore Leonard stories to be published in June - LA Times. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Home is where the heart is …

 Missouri Loves Company - Front Porch Republic. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

With fair success...

Finding Mother...

Burying the King

THE day began dull and damp. The streets of Leicester were washed with rain, and gusts of wind whipped vestments and caused hats to be firmly clasped to the head. But the weather proved to match the dynamic of a service that was first solemn, and then joyful and uplifting.
 Richard III's burial, 500 years late.

Frank!!! Are you okay???

For years, Andrew Sullivan blogged at a prolific rate.

His prodigious output was supplemented by dispatches from readers, public debates with fellow bloggers and ruminations on everything from the Geneva Conventions to "South Park." Blogging was a medium -- and a lifestyle -- that he helped pioneer. It also nearly proved to be his undoing.

"The truth is, I had to stop primarily because it was killing me," Sullivan said Sunday night at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan. "I used to joke that if blogging does kill someone, I would be the first to find out."

He described the grueling pace that he maintained along with a small editorial staff.

"This is 40 posts a day -- every 20 minutes, seven days a week," Sullivan said.

Deadline tomorrow …

… 2015 Able Muse Book Award | Able Muse Press.

In case you wondered …

… Detectives Beyond Borders: What do comics do better than, er, non-comics?

Much noise, little thought …

… Anecdotal Evidence: `Willingness to Hear'.



I have noticed that what people pass off as their opinions are things they've read or heard about and have accepted uncritically.

Today's music …

Anger management …

… Don’t be Mad | BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog.

One would hope ….

… The Pope Is a Christian! by Garry Wills | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

The modern Pharisees try to refuse the Eucharist to politicians who do not meet their doctrinal tests.
The Church happens to have some non-negotiable doctrines. A politician who trims his faith in the interest of political expediency is, like Wills himself, mauvaise foi.

They are not used to having a pope who is a Christian.
Garry knowing all about who's a Christian and who isn't.

Hoping for change …

… Child brides take gov’t to court over marriage laws.

Work station …

Paul Davis On Crime: The Desk Where Dickens Sat To Write Great Expectations, Our Mutual Friend And The Mystery of Edwin Drood Has Been Bought By The Charles Dickens Museum In London.

Something to think on …

If one is master of one thing and understands one thing well, one has at the same time, insight into and understanding of many things.
— Vincent Van Gogh, born on this date in 1853

Here he comes...

Being in the world...

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Haiku …


Spring’s air and sunlight,
Reversing those of autumn,
Though the day’s not warm.

Alexander McCall Smith rewrites Jane Austen

...She provides a fascinating picture of the ways of that slice of society and the confines within which its members, particularly women, are obliged to live. She is also extremely funny, able to paint the foibles of characters with a dry wit that has dated very little. Her books are intimate and compelling. She has a voice that somehow seems to chime even with a modern sensibility. She is, in essence, timeless.
So, if you are an author and a publisher sidles up to you and asks you to rewrite a Jane Austen novel, setting it in modern times, what do you say? It took me no more than 45 seconds to say yes to an invitation to rewrite “Emma.” And I then had more fun doing it than I have had for as many years as I can remember.

The 50 most translated books...

At the top...
 

and the other 49.

Maverick scientist …

… Rupert Sheldrake Interview | The Best Schools. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

When I was 17, in the gap between leaving school and going to study at Cambridge, I worked as a temporary lab technician in a pharmaceutical laboratory, because I wanted to get some research experience.
What I didn’t know when I took the job was that it was a vivisection facility.Working there made me ask some deep questions about animals, animal suffering, scientific objectivity, and mechanistic attitudes to nature, which were put into practice on a daily basis in this laboratory, which was a kind of death camp for animals.
Scientism is just about the only religion left that has animal sacrifice as its focus of worship.

… the materialist belief-system is self-refuting. If a materialist were consistent, he or she would have to believe that his or her own beliefs were caused by brain activity alone. Materialists’ brains make them believe in materialism.
I made much the same point in my review of Julian Barnes's Nothing To Be Frightened Of.

Listen in …

 Episode 112 – Clive James: Remainder | Virtual Memories. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Women training boys …

… Book Review: 'The Winter Boy,' A Cultural Fantasy by Sally Wiener Grotta - seattlepi.com.

The significance of tiny incidents …

… Celebration of Life’s Experiences by P C K Prem.

Today's music …

Inquirer reviews …

 Duane Swierczysnki's 'Canary': Down Philly's mean Mafia streets an honors student must go.

… Robert Alter refreshes the Bible.

… 'Single, Carefree, Mellow': Stories that remind us we're not so unique.

 Hell and Good Company': Vivid portrait of Spanish Civil War.

The gospel of Philip …

… Article— Philip Glass Half Full — Commentary Magazine.

Revealingly, it was not a composer but an avant-garde playwright, Samuel Beckett, who served as his main source of inspiration. Like so many of his contemporaries, Glass was “feeling the exhaustion of the romantic principle” that had hitherto driven the story-based dramas of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams. For him, traditional classical music was also a storytelling art, one that uses tonal harmony to articulate and propel large-scale “narratives” that unfold over time. But Glass aspired to write music that would be similar in effect to Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, in which scene follows scene in a way that bears no resemblance to the tightly wrought plot of a conventional play. Such a music, as he explains, would have “the coherence of rationality without the logic,” instead offering its listeners “an emotional high that came from being detached from the world of the rational and the dramatic.”
I heard a piano concerto of Glass's in concert once (I don't know if he's written more than one). It was  a moderately pleasant interval of noodling.

Unearthly hour...

Saturday, March 28, 2015

The AP loses it …

… Has the Associated Press hierarchy officially changed its style for references to 'God'? — GetReligion.



More PC From AP's Stylebook: 'Climate Change' Now Equals 'Global Warming'.

The luminous world …

… First Known When Lost: Little Things.

The modern clang …

… Anecdotal Evidence: `The Last Sounds He Heard'.



Rorem's diaries are masterful. I am especially fond of the New York Diaries. But we should never forget his music.

Today's music …

Taking it easy …

It's Saturday, and it's my wife's birthday. The week past was hectic, since we were having work done on our house. So I am taking it easy today. Sparse blogging.

That's why they have third orders …

Married Monasticism - Ethika Politika. (Hat tip, Joe May.)

According to Canon Law, a third order is an association "whose members share in the spirit of some religious institute while in secular life, lead an apostolic life, and strive for Christian perfection under the higher direction of the same institute are called third orders or some other appropriate name."

Plenty to meet the eye …

… for those who have eyes to see: The Low Standards of Norman Rockwell's Critics - Front Porch Republic. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Welcome to...

...The Shut-In Economy
When Mallon gets back to her apartment at night for about a precious hour of free time before heading to bed (her boyfriend, who works in private equity, doesn’t make it home until 1 a.m.) Alfred has handled the rest. Gluten-free groceries from Whole Foods in the cupboards, her laundry hung, her packages picked up, others delivered, her bed made, her kitchen table tidied — and a note asking what she needs for next time.

Tuna country...

Glowing in a dreary chair …

… Looking for Flannery O’Connor on Her 90th Birthday — “The Dreary Chair She Sat in Glowed.” | Town Topics. (Hat tip, Virginia Kerr.)

Art and world …

 Zealotry of Guerin: Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (Sargent), Sonnet #235.