Saturday, November 12, 2016

And empty, too …

… Safe Spaces - Washington Free Beacon. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Safe spaces, microaggressions, and trigger warnings are outward and visible signs of an inward weakness that barely holds back a bubbling, psychotic violence. Students are told to have neither thick skins nor self-restraint. In fact, they are rewarded for thin skins and uninhibited anger, ready to lash out at anything that they can imagine disturbing them. “Fragility and vulnerability are the defining characteristics” that colleges believe their students to have, and any criticism of their ideas becomes “an unacceptable challenge to their personas.”

2 comments:

  1. http://www.pauldavisoncrime.com/2016/11/my-safe-place-aircraft-carrier-uss.html

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  2. Jeff Mauvais11:40 PM

    The problem extends far beyond the trigger warning neurotics on college campuses. It became very clear to me during the endless election season that the grievance culture now encompasses the entire political spectrum, the entire social spectrum, the entire educational spectrum. We are quickly becoming a nation of crybabies and special pleaders. Is the guy who is outraged that he can no longer graduate from high school and walk directly into a job installing windshield wipers on an auto assembly line for 80 grand a year and lifetime benefits really any different from a campus safe space ninny?

    Lest anyone accuse me of being a snobbish member of the educated elite, some brief biographical details:

    My father was born on a subsistence farm in the Snake River Valley of southern Idaho, and my mother was raised, along with her three siblings, by a single mother in a small silver mining town in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah. My parents, aunts and uncles all attended parochial schools through 8th grade, and then graduated from public high schools, where their formal education ended. Yet all of them -- through self-discipline, hard work and thrift -- managed to provide their own families with solid middle class lives.

    The next generation, sixteen of us, inherited the same values along with a healthy respect for education, and all did well in school. Eight of us chose to attend college and eight chose not to. Among the latter, we include a Chief Petty Officer in the Navy, an L.A. County firefighter, a manager of a moving and storage company and a jazz musician. And, again, all of us have provided our own families with the same middle class standard of living.

    My daughter's generation seems to be following the same pattern, with some attending college and some not. In fact, the most accomplished member of all three generations is a three-time world champion surfer who, now in his early 40's, has provided his family a very comfortable life through product endorsements and instructional clinics around the world. He didn't attend college, but did work his ass off to perfect his craft -- in the water from before dawn until after dusk, 365 days a year.

    Moreover, we're all practicing Catholics who don't feel the least bit marginalized or dismissed by the broader secular culture, despite all of the claptrap that's been published since the election.

    The point of this somewhat longer than I intended comment: at this stage in American history, economic opportunity is available to anyone with the self-discipline and drive to pursue it. People aren't "left behind", they stay behind.

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