Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Something to think on …

Only divine love bestows the keys of knowledge.
— Arthur Rimbaud, born on this date in 1854

Blogging note …

 I have a doctor’s appointment this morning — my semi-annual SynVisc shots for my knees. I probably won’t be blogging until later in the day. 

Word of the Day …

… Craquelure | Word Genius.

Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Just so you know …

… Lectures From Limousine Liberals - Tablet Magazine.

… COVID-19 wasn’t exactly the great equalizer. In fact, it was the exact opposite, revealing existing structural inequalities—many of which were only deepened by the public health response to the virus. Now, as the debate moves from school closures and Zoom workplaces to vaccines and mandates, the policies catering to the “pajama class” and hurting vulnerable people continue—and the delusional, self-serving rhetoric surrounding them only grows more poisonous.
Not everyone believes this, of course.

In case you wondered …

… Miscellaneous Musings : HOW THE "VICTORIAN MYSTERY" WAS BORN.

It’s white whale, folks …

… Miscellaneous Musings : 3 ways to harpoon "Moby Dick" on its 170th anniversary.

October Poetry at North of Oxford …

 … Stargrass, Violets by Barbara Daniels.

… Petco Parking Lot by Nancy Byrne Iannucci.

… Three Poems by Peycho Kanev.

… Sh-Boom, Sh-Boom by Howie Good.

… Birthday by Rustin Larson.


From the Editors:

Thunder, Lightning and Urban Cowboys by g emil reutter.

Covid 19 2020 – A Poetic Journal by Diane Sahms-Guarnieri.

Something to think on …

Forget the damned motor car and build the cities for lovers and friends.
— Lewis Mumford, born on this date in 1895

Q&A …

… An Interview with Rachel Hadas [by Aspen Matis] - The Best American Poetry. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

I’m wary of making grandiose claims for poetry. (Would that it were, that anything were, a unifying force!) Poets have always loved to talk about how powerful and important poetry is, and I’m no exception. Poetry’s power to fuse the private and the universal always amazes me, as does its ability to offer a reprieve (as you aptly phrase it) from the mundanity and suffering of day-to-day existence. But poetry’s role is more complicated than that. Poetry is often made of mundanity and suffering; if it excludes or flees them, it risks being empty, generic, sentimental. Each poet has to manage their own balancing act, whether in formal or thematic terms, or both, between the mundane and the visionary, the public and the private — one could add so many pairs. A complicating factor is that poets come with their own talents and temperaments, their own obsessions and models, their own reading and experience.

Word of the Day …

… Gemeinschaft | Word Genius.

Monday, October 18, 2021

Just so you know …

… Saying Ngo to Antifa | Frontpagemag. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Although Antifa members fall into a range of ideological categories - “anarchists, communists, anarcho-syndicalists, Marxist black nationalists, and so on” (BLM is more purely communist) - the group has one overarching, unifying goal: to overthrow America. “Before May 20,” recalls Ngo in his splendid new book Unmasked: Inside Antifas’s Radical Plan to Destroy Democracy, “I never thought antifa could ever come close to achieving this goal.” (He prefers to write “antifa” with a lower-case initial “a.”) Then he saw Antifa take over parts of U.S. cities, whose elected leaders refused to fight back.

Nothing surprising about this. They are sure they know more and better than the rest of us. So why should we count? The funny thing is discovering, when you meet them, how ignorant they are. No wonder they don’t want to engage in dialogue. 

Nice — and altogether correct …

… PIERS MORGAN: RIP General Powell - the greatest president the US never had | Daily Mail Online.

Take care …

… you are in our prayers:  Miscellaneous Musings : I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree.

Sure sounds like it …

… Was the Moderna Booster Approved Despite Poor Data?

The big story in the not-too-distant is going to be how wretchedly this whole Covid business has been managed and reported. 

Saith the Lord …

… Miscellaneous Musings : You shall not tattoo any marks upon you.

Something to think on …

Some other faculty than the intellect is necessary for the apprehension of reality.
— Henri Bergson, born on this date in 1859

Good question …

… America When Will You Be Angelic? | Church Life Journal | University of Notre Dame.

Miłosz may not have been entirely aware that he was gradually turning away from the vatic tradition, remembering the effect it had on an idealistic generation of young men who gave their lives in a gesture of futile resistance and were buried in the wreckage of Warsaw. He was downplaying these bardic elements in the United States, perhaps relieved to put some distance between himself and that dark history, and he would eventually come to a new understanding as he was later drawn back to a free Poland. In the meantime, bardic prophecy and messianism wouldnt do in a country that was increasingly turning to science and technology to answer age-old questions.

Word of the Day …

… Butyraceous | Word Genius.

Sunday, October 17, 2021

RIP …

… ‘He was Ireland’s most popular poet’. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Mysterious ways …

KEROUAC’S BEATIFIC VISIONS. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Ti Jean (Kerouac’s nickname) was baptized in Lowell, Massachusetts, to a family of “mill rats”—French Canadian Catholics who lived in ghettos. Kerouac’s favorite intercessor was St. Joseph (a “humble, self-admitting, truthful saint”), on whose feast he was born in 1922. Ti Jean’s devotion to St. Thérèse of Lisieux continued through decades; until death he watched for her roses from heaven. Even so, he left the Church at fourteen. Mystifying memories of Ste. Jeanne de Arc’s statues returned to him regularly, though. Hes believed that he was able to, at times, “stop being a maniacal drunkard” on account of “the Holy Mother”: “Ever since I instituted the little prayer, I've not been lushing.”

I suspect Kerouac’s imperfect faith is as common as it is in the end efficacious.

In case you wondered …

Where Did the Phrase “Hubba Hubba” Come From?

I associate it with my older brother in connection with 1940s boogie woogie dancing (which he did quite well).


Another clownish college …

… College works to fire tenured professor fighting to maintain rigorous math standards | The College Fix.

Maybe the should have the college president take a math test.

The essential mystery …

… Death and the Catholic Imagination | The Russell Kirk Center. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)
.
(Dave also sends along this: Echoes and Whispers: Q&A with A.G. Mojtabai.

A. G. Mojtabai’s novella Thirst, published by Slant, is a recent example of literature that can draw one out of the banality of materialism and force us to grapple with the knowledge that we are dust, and to dust we shall return. It can be read as an extended meditation on death and dying; by natural extension, it can also be read as an extended meditation on life and living. For if we don’t know what it means to die, can we be said to know what it means to live?

Four dear friends of mine have died in the past year. When you get to be my age, death and dying grow familiar. My brother died a few minutes before I arrived to visit him. But I saw him lying there. And my daughter Jennifer and I held her mother’s hand for about eight hours while she passed from coma into death. My first direct encounter with death took place when I was about 11 and discovered that the man sitting in the car in front of our house had committed suicide.

Sea cruise …

… Miscellaneous Musings : An update from the Mayflower after 40 days at sea.

Something to think on …

Only those who still have hope can benefit from tears.
— Nathanael West, born on this date in 1903

Centenary homage …

… The Bard That Sang Stromness #2 | gists.

Casting about for wisdom …

Potcake Poet’s Choice: John Beaton, ‘Shadow-casting’. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Word of the Day …

… Galère | Word Genius.

Saturday, October 16, 2021

Blogging note …

 My grandson Ben turned 21 today. We are taking him out for dinner and his first legal drink. Blogging will resume tomorrow.

Hmm …

… Squalor By the Seaside | City Journal.

Over the weekend, Venice logged yet another RV fire, this time outside Whole Foods. Dark plumes of smoke were visible from miles around. I was surprised to find on my last shopping trip that, three days after the blaze, the charred RV had not been removed. Now burned down to its metal frame, the RV remained in the same place where it had been parked for over a year. Soot covers the surrounding sidewalks and retail stores, and particles of ash and debris rustle in the wind. The windows of a nearby store were blown out and are boarded with plywood, and nearby vegetation is burned to a crisp. Someone scrawled “Boninville” on the RV, a reference to Los Angeles city councilmember Mike Bonin, whose inaction has frustrated residents living in deteriorating conditions alongside the homeless.
And yet there are still plenty of people who trust the political class. Weird.

Well, what do they know …

Dozens of Scientists, Others Could Be Fired After Judge Won’t Halt COVID Vaccine Mandate.

The politicians must know better, right? Right.

Natural song …

… Zealotry of Guerin: Poetry and Fiction by Christopher Guerin: Cicada (Hua Yan), Sonnet #584.

The music of nature …

 Zealotry of Guerin: Poetry and Fiction by Christopher Guerin: Cicada (Hua Yan), Sonnet #584.

Appreciation …

… AN Wilson on Brideshead Revisited - The Oldie. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

… the novel bursts with the life of so many unforgettable figures. They all ring true. Even the walk-on parts such as the Quartering Commandant, who regrets the vandalistic behaviour of the soldiers billeted at Brideshead, or the priest who administers the last rites to Lord Marchmain, Fr McKay, Glasgow Irish, are drawn with exquisite economy and are immediately recognizable, just as a great master of portraiture like John Singer Sargent, for example, was able to capture likenesses not only in his finished “swagger” portraits but also in sketches , using only a few perfectly sure pencil lines.

Something to think on …

The rational transparency and beauty of the universe are surely too remarkable to be treated as just happy accidents.
— John Polkinghorne, born on this date in 1930

Interesting …

… Miscellaneous Musings : Need beer? Get yourself a woman with brewing skills!

Word of the Day …

… Prosopography | Word Genius.

Breathless …

… Song Sparrow by Bruce Willard | American Life in Poetry. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Friday, October 15, 2021

Man of letters …

… Miscellaneous Musings : Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters (2007).

Hmm …

… Apalache, by Paul Metcalf (1976). (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)


Unfortunately, as today’s American historians are demonstrating with increasing effectiveness (and controversy), much of this land’s history is colored by discrimination, hatred, exploitation, and violence.


Unfortunately, the same is also true of human history in general. 

Once upon a time …

 Miscellaneous Musings : Soviet ballistic missiles being installed in Cuba.

The trouble with experts …

… ‘The Deep Places’ Review: Patient, Heal Thyself. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Within days of acquiring the dream house, Mr. Douthat awoke with a stiff neck. He found “a red swelling” six inches down from his left ear. “It’s just a boil,” said a doctor, his insouciant declaration the first of many diagnoses in which it was claimed that there was nothing physically wrong with him. Lyme—a debilitating bacterial disease acquired from deer-tick bites—was ruled out because many of his symptoms didn’t match a rigid checklist drawn up for the ailment by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This “diagnostic standardization,” Mr. Douthat writes, was “supposed to establish a consistent baseline for national case reporting, not rule out the possibility of atypical cases or constrain doctors from diagnosing them.” As a result of such inflexibility, he tells us, doctors miss “anywhere from a third to half of early Lyme cases.”


Appreciation …

They’re playing our song. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Something to think on …

Well, why do you want a political career? Have you ever been in the House of Commons and taken a good square look at the inmates? As weird a gaggle of freaks and sub-humans as was ever collected in one spot.
— P. G. Wodehouse, born on this date in 1881

Word of the Day …

… Zymurgy | Word Genius.

Thursday, October 14, 2021

How wonderful …

… New face | About Last Night. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

My late wife Hilary, to whom I was wholly devoted, wanted me to find a new partner as soon as possible after she died, so much so that she brought up the subject more than once in her last months. “You’ll make a shitty singleton,” she warned me. I knew she was right, but I didn’t think it possible that I would get so lucky twice in a lifetime, 

Word of the Day …

… Latitudinarian | Word Genius.

Something to think on …

The aim of totalitarian education has never been to instill convictions but to destroy the capacity to form any.
— Hannah Arendt, born on this date in 1906

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

I fear it be so …

… No respect - Philadelphia Weekly. (Hat tip, Paul Davis.)

If you’ve ever been at a meeting of progressive Democrats, or even of the country club sort of Republicans who like to “get along” with them, such as the ones who define as “Never Trumpers,” you will detect an obvious disdain for working-class white ethnic groups. I have “passed” in those circles, being an attorney who practices in the so-called liberal field of immigration. Those who have not read my columns or heard me on the radio or TV assume I am one of them. It’s “Imitation of Life,” just substituting mindset for race. I’m not one of them, but I look like one of them and so the guard is down. Like that fly on the proverbial wall, I have access to what they say when they think no one is listening beyond the sterile bubble of elite wisdom.

Philosophical authenticity …

… Edward Feser: From Socrates to Stock. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)


Prof. Kathleen Stock has for some time now been under siege from the spiritual heirs of Socrates’ persecutors.  She is a feminist and no conservative, but she has dared through rational analysis and argumentation to defend the proposition that the difference between the sexes is objectively real rather than a mere social construct, most recently in her book Material Girls.  Until about twenty minutes ago no one would have thought this controversial, but for the cultural revolutionaries seeking to take over our institutions, it merits hemlock.  The fanatics are now trying to get her fired, though so far her university is standing by her.

Good for them …

… sweden wins again - by el gato malo - bad cattitude. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Of course, why trust common sense when you have geniuses like Dr. Fauci to guide you?



Me too …

… PIERS MORGAN: I'm getting no satisfaction from seeing the Stones surrender to the woke brigade | Daily Mail Online.

Honorable anniversary …

… Miscellaneous Musings : Anchors Aweigh, my boys, Anchors Aweigh..

Something to think on …

The superficial distinctions of Fascism, Bolshevism, Hitlerism, are the concern of journalists and publicists; the serious student sees in them only one root-idea of a complete conversion of social power into State power.
— Albert Jay Nock, born on this date in 1870

Our town …

 Paul Davis On Crime: My Crime Fiction: 'Murder By The Park'.

ppreciation …

… Rocky Mountain Epigrams - Intercollegiate Studies Institute. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

When Brosman’s Breakwater appeared in 2009, I hailed its ambitious architecture, which drew into a single form meditations on the love found in a late remarriage to her long-estranged first husband, Patric Savage, alongside sketches of literary figures such as Mina Loy and D. H. Lawrence, whose troubled relationships with eros have much to teach us about where individual lives and entire civilizations go wrong. I had rarely seen a contemporary poet capable of entering so deeply, sharply, and unsparingly into that universal mystery of human life, the persistence and folly of romance.

In case you wondered …

… Why we should venerate Evelyn Waugh - The Spectator World.(Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

While he deals most directly with this theme in Robbery Under Law — less a travel book than a sophisticated historical disquisition written following his return from a brief sojourn in revolutionary Mexico in 1938 — the concept of civilization under never-ending siege underlies all of his novels, which he succinctly described as ‘the creation of small independent systems of order’.

Word of the Day …

… Fascicle | Word Genius.

Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Blogging note …

 I am at Jefferson’s sports medicine department awaiting some cortisone shots (my SynVisc shots have been delayed). Afterwards, I will be walking around the corner to my barber. Blogging will resume later.

Something to think on …

Just take everything exactly as it is, put it in God's hands and leave it with Him.
— Edith Stein, born on this date in 1891

State of fear …

… The Most Frightened Nation | City Journal. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



Not the pandemic itself, but the state’s response to it, has been a catastrophe for Britain. The waiting list for non-Covid medical treatment may soon approach 13 million people (out of a total population of only 67 million). Children have lost nearly a year of education. Mental health has decayed; domestic abuse has accelerated. Sovereign debt has soared; small business has been ravaged.

Word of the Day …

 Lucullan | Word Genius.

Monday, October 11, 2021

I fear this may be so …

… The Appalling Moral Failure of Francis Collins | Evolution News.

I very much liked The Language of God, and the impression I got of Collins while reading it was very positive. Perhaps he is one of those sad people who can compartmentalize mind and morals.

Take that, MIT …

… Thousands register for remote lecture at Princeton after MIT axed it after outraging Twitter mob | Daily Mail Online.

I think it is beginning to dawn on more and more people that what is still referred to as :higher education:" has become a joke — though not a very funny one. The older I get the happier I am for that day in 1965 when it occurred to me that I didn't want to spend the rest of my life  in the faculty lounge.

Something to think on …

God does not answer our desperate questionings; he simply gives us himself.
— François Mauriac, born on this date in 1885

Word of the Day …

… Artificer | Word Genius.

Sunday, October 10, 2021

Much indeed in what he says …

World Renowned Psychiatrist: ‘Global Predators’ Fauci, Gates, and Schwab Behind the COVID ‘Reign of Terror’.

“How does it make sense that they’re absolutely ignoring that in America now, we have over 13,000 reports of death (to the CDC) from the vaccine, and no one is investigating it?” he asked.

Breggin pointed out that in past years, if there had been only 200 deaths from all of the vaccines put together, it would have been considered a catastrophe.

“Now we have a vaccine that has more deaths than every other vaccine all put together. So how can we ignore that?” he continued.

Meanwhile, Breggin noted, there there are highly inflated numbers of COVID deaths that have been falsified by manipulating the reporting mechanisms.

The dumbest generation …

American Red Guards Accuse Honored Chinese-American Music Prof of Racism for Screening Shakespeare's 'Othello'.

Any student who was “traumatized” by a performance of one of the most compelling characters in literature by one of the best actors who ever lived deserves an “F.”

 

The importance of stories …

… LEE CHILD ON THE INVENTION OF FICTION. (Hat tip, Tim Davis.)

 Some explanation is needed, of how a relatively weak and vulnerable and not-very-successful hominid proto-human later came to dominate the whole world and reach outward into the universe.  How did that happen?

Something to think on …

It's so easy for propaganda to work, and dissent to be mocked.
— Harold Pinter, born on this date in 1930

Blogging note

 My wife is not feeling well at all. I will be taking her to the urgent care center layer this morning. In the meantime, blogging will be mostly on hold.

Word of the Day …

… Stridulate | Word Genius.

Saturday, October 09, 2021

Hmm …

… Jeremy Wikeley on Twitter: "The two kinds of poems, according to Gavin Ewart https://t.co/nnCOQ0ux52" / Twitter. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Well, Twitter only wants us to know what they approve of …

… Twitter Censors Thread From Entrepreneur Who Regrets Taking the Vaccine After Serious Side Effects. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Urban rhythm …

 Zealotry of Guerin: Poetry and Fiction by Christopher Guerin: Broadway Boogie-Woogie (Piet Mondrian), Sonnet #583.

Something to think on …

If people would know how little brain is ruling the world, they would die of fear.
— Ivo Andric, born on this date in 1892

That was then, what about now …

 In Praise of Jesuit Humanism | The Russell Kirk Center. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

The culture that produced the genius of a Balde began with the smallest of seeds. Today, the academic excellence and missionary drive of the Jesuits have planted universities and preparatory schools in their honor throughout the world. And it’s hard not to view the early beginnings of that educational dream through the lens of its later success.

I am a graduate of a Jesuit college. Edward Gannon, S.J. Was the most important intellectual and moral influence in my life. But Georgetown, Marquette, and Boston College seem more woke these days than Catholic. The current pontiff is not the sort of Jesuit who taught me.

Humpty Dumpty all over again …

… zmkc: Is There a Sub Text?

Word of the Day …

… Amalgamate | Word Genius.

Friday, October 08, 2021

Nir surprising …

Hope for America’s Future Fades.

It well may …

… The Abbess of Andalusia: The Truth Shall Make You Odd.

Just so you know …

It Was A Situation For Despair: Corruption In The Pharmaceuticals — Guest Post by Robert Yoho. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)
I recently published Butchered by “Healthcare”, a book about how medicine has degenerated over the past 20 years. The corporations have been marketing drugs that barely worked or did not work. They gained power by spreading fear and disease-mongering. The covid story is a continuation of the same modus writ large and with astonishing chutzpah. The following is how the parts fit together. The other players in the scrum—the media, the tech companies, and the politicians—have motives related to the Pharma corporations.

Regarding the media, there's this: New York Times issues correction after egregiously exaggerating coronavirus child hospitalizations.

Something to think on …

Even against the greatest of odds, there is something in the human spirit - a magic blend of skill, faith, and valor - that can lift men from certain defeat to incredible victory
— Walter Lord, born on this date in 1917

Good …

… Colleges Learning Costly Woke Math in the Courtroom School of Hard Knocks | RealClearInvestigations.

The number of administrators has exploded since the late 1990s, prompting many in and outside of academe to blame “administrative bloat” for the legal trouble. Bureaucrats now outnumber faculty 2 to 1 at public universities, double the ratio in the 1970s. 

Word of the Day …

… Hispid | Word Genius.

Thursday, October 07, 2021

Be on guard …

… Paul Davis On Crime: Feds Warn Of 'The Grandparent Scam': My Philadelphia Weekly Crime Beat Column On Scheme That Targets The Elderly.

Out of the silence …

… Word - Intercollegiate Studies Institute. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Change of direction …

… Encounters with Mark Twain: Let me introduce you to my lifelong friend, Mark Twain.

Sad …

… Paul Davis On Crime: Old Aircraft Carriers Kitty Hawk And John F. Kennedy Are Sold For A Penny, But Their History of Service is Priceless.

Not much, I would think …

… The American Pageant : What do you think Mark Twain would say about CRT?

Mark thy calendar …

 


Anniversary …

 The American Pageant : Kennedy and Nixon debate Cold War foreign policy.

The magic of the past …

… zmkc: Treasure in Plain Sight.

… as we grow older it is difficult to retain a sense of magic and of the past being all about us. But sometimes still that feeling can be recaptured. For me, it happened when I stepped inside the parish church of St Just in Cornwall. The interior of that place is quiet and shadowy and resonant in a beautifully melancholy way. 

Plenty, actually …

What’s in a name? (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)
Praise be appellative diversity! Mr Duck is joined this year in the football animal kingdom by Charlotte’s Panda Askew, Eastern Michigan’s Sidy Sow, and Hawk Wimmer of the Air Force Academy. Each had best keep his distance from Appalachian State center Baer Hunter.

Considering what one has read …

 The Old Devil by Philip Hensher. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

One of the most unexpected of these authors turned out to be Kingsley Amis, whose books I’d picked up here and there in different editions: the rebarbative yellow Gollancz hardbacks, versions with that scattered-objects cover design that was so popular with publishers in the 1960s, chic modern-classics relaunches and one 1970s paperback (The Green Man) with a cover so lurid that I hadn’t been able to read it on a train. This took me back. I would have said, if asked, that Lucky Jim was a classic and that Girl, 20 and I Want It Now are both underrated and insightful novels of their time. But was I an admirer of the work as a whole? Well, I had every novel, including The Anti-Death League and The Riverside Villas Murder, some two dozen in total. So evidently yes. Did I agree with most of what they had to say? Hardly at all. They stayed and have gone on being disagreed with.

Something to think on …

Law may prescribe that the male nipples be made equal to the female ones, but they still will not give milk.
— Allan Bloom, who died on this date in 1992

And the winners are …

2021 Global Photo Contest Winners | The Nature Conservancy. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Word of the Day …

… Flinders | Word Genius.

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

Trio …

… Sherlock Holmes & Co.: Spiritualism, Houdini, and Conan Doyle.

Hmm …

New light on past news about Flannery O’Connor.

Hmm …

… Shakespeare's 'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day' is voted greatest poem ever written | Daily Mail Online. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

But much poetry are those who voted familiar with? Of the sonnets I think my favorite is "Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments." But there a certainly poems as greater or greater than either of these sonnets.

RIP …

… Mountain gorilla who became viral selfie star dies cradled in the arms of man who rescued her | Daily Mail Online.

Our town …

 Kenney & Outlaw Clueless, D.A. AWOL As Philly Tops 400 Murders | Big Trial | Philadelphia Trial. Blog (Hat tip, Paul Davis.)

As the city remains in crisis, the dysfunction of its leadership was on full display last week. And so was the malpractice of our docile local media. As the bodies piled up, the city's reporters repeatedly failed to do their job by holding Kenney, Outlaw and Krasner accountable for the bloodshed.

Those were the days …

… The American Pageant : Preparing for doomsday on 6 October.

Something to think on …

Progress is man's ability to complicate simplicity.
— Thor Heyerdahl, born on this dare in 1914

In case you’re interested …

Miscellaneous Musings : Who Will Win the 2021 Nobel Prize in Literature?

Word of the Day …

 Quag | Word Genius.

Tuesday, October 05, 2021

Hmm …

… David Hockney: 'Abstraction in art has run its course'. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Giacometti described abstraction as “the art of the handkerchief”. And that’s what the illustration looked like to me, nothing more… Why was abstraction necessary? I think it was. Its job was to take away the shadows that had dominated European art for centuries. It was only European art that used them.

Sounds tin-eared to me …

… Too Original | Commonweal Magazine. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Reading further through Ruden’s lengthy introduction, I became increasingly uneasy about her claim to “straightforwardness.” She starts by providing a characterization of each Gospel that is, in the main, unexceptionable, if not always accurate. She gives no indication, for example, that the Gospel of Luke is (with the Acts of the Apostles) part of a two-volume composition, and she thinks that this most non-docetic narrative was influenced by Gnosticism. She similarly states that the Gospel of John has the “strongest links to Gnosticism,” a view that few if any scholars after the time of Bultmann would maintain. Unless Ruden has access to evidence unavailable to the general run of competent New Testament scholars, one would have to declare these statements simply erroneous.8

Being there …

SPOTLIGHT: Thunder, Lightning and Urban Cowboys by g emil reutter.

No kidding …

 No One Trusts Public Health Officials -- Not Even Health Care Professionals.
Oh, I  don't know about "no one." : I certainly encounter enough people who seem to have pledged fidelity to whatever the so-called experts say — even if better-qualified experts disagree.

Great news …

… Lt Colonel Stuart Scheller Jr. is being released from military brig TODAY | Daily Mail Online.

Next step is to fire the traitorous Milley.

Just so you know …

… People just love dead Jews > New English Review. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Certain intellectuals, Jews among them, attempt to hide their rabid Jew-hatred by focusing on the European Holocaust—on all the dead Jews—as a way of diverting attention from the impending (slow motion) Holocaust against living Jews. Because they oppose what was done to the Jews in World War Two, they feel justified, credentialed, to say that today’s attacks on Israel are ‘justified,’ that the Palestinians are now the true victims, (the ‘new Jews’ in a sense), and the Israeli Jews are their ‘Nazi’ persecutors.”
As George Orwell pointed out, “There are some ideas so absurd that only an intellectual could believe them.”

This may offend …

The Unbreakable Will of This Pennsylvania Town.

Ellis said what is most important to know is what happens after someone wins one of the guns in the raffle. “If it’s the pistol, they can’t be under 21,” he explained. “If they won the rifle or shotgun, they have to be 18, and then they have to fill out the federal 4473 form.”

If they pass the federal background check, they have to go through the Pennsylvania state background check as well. “So it’s a quite extensive process that they have to go through,” he said. “They’re not handed over to them like, ‘Hey, you won. Here is your gun.’ There’s a legal aspect to it that they have to go through first.”

After all, it's published by something called American Greatness, and that can't be good, right? And the people involved are obviously not woke, and don't necessarily believe whatever the "authorities" tell them. Got to be careful of those.

RIP ¬

… Robert Murray Davis (1934-2021) R.I.P. | The Evelyn Waugh Society. (Hat ti[p, Dave Lull,)

Hmm …

… Bridgerton stylist, 53, WAS double-jabbed with no underlying conditions, confirm family | Daily Mail Online.

Home improvement …

… The Abbess of Andalusia: GC breaks ground on new Andalusia Interpretive Center.

Cause for hope …

… A ‘Pacemaker for the Brain’: No Treatment Helped Her Depression — Until This. (Hat tip, Dave Lull)

Twelve days after Sarah’s device was fully operational in August 2020, her score on a standard depression scale dropped to 14 from 33, and several months later, it fell below 10, essentially signaling remission, the researchers reported.

In memoriam…

… Moonstone Remembers Louis McKee | North of Oxford.

A priest for our times …

… Ronald Knox as Spiritual Master ~ The Imaginative Conservative. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

There is something gentle yet hard-edged here—Knox encourages us not to be taken in by desires to experience the effects of God’s grace; we should instead want to experience God. And as it is in the small arenas of our lives, so it is as we experience the large things of society and life.

Something to think on …

Follow the man who seeks the truth; run from the man who has found it.
— Václav Havel, born on this date in 1936

Word of the Day …

… Appanage | Word Genius.

Monday, October 04, 2021

In case you've been wondering …

… The Abbess of Andalusia Blog: How to experience God in the midst of upheaval.

I think Mr. Stevens would approve …

… Sonnet for the Third of August | The North American Anglican. (Hat tip,Dave Lull.)

Never underestimate an index …

… Anthony Grafton — Fake it till you make it: Indexing — LRB 23 September 2021. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Good indexes actually worked as they were supposed to, but they still attracted plenty of criticism. Even the greatest experts on indexing – the scholarly print professionals who compiled them – feared that they might prevent readers from going through their texts with the proper energy and attentiveness. 

Anniversary …

… Paul Davis On Crime: Classic Crime Thriller 'The French Connection' Turns 50.

Nice guy …

… Mastermind behind Insulate Britain eco-mob says he would have REFUSED to move for crying woman | Daily Mail Online.

Just the kind of guy I wouldn't mind beating the shit out of

Hmm …

… Miscellaneous Musings : Top 10 Best Novelists of All Time?

They should take a look at Willa Cather, and try reading people who did not write in English. There's that guy Dostoyevsky, for instance.

Anniversary …

… The American Pageant : Soviet Union inaugurates the Space Age.

Something to think on …

When we accept what happens to us and make the best of it, we are praising God.
— Teresa of Avila, who died on this date in 1582

An elusive fellow …

… Colm Toibin on Thom Gunn Letters, edited by Michael Nott, August Kleinzahler and Clive Wilmer. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

As these letters make clear, Gunn came in many guises. At one moment, he is all drift and easy-going charm; at other times, he is filled with determination. He can be dogmatic, especially about poetry, but he can also be open-minded, ready to learn. 

Word of the Day …

… Esemplastic | Word Genius.

Sunday, October 03, 2021

So there!

“Not one single case of throat irritation”.

I never git in into cigarettes that much, but I certainly. did my share of weed

Worth getting to know …

… Heroes of the Pandemic


Dr. Robert Malone is a medical doctor and an infectious-disease researcher, and is recognized as the discoverer of in-vitro and in-vivo RNA transfection and the inventor of mRNA vaccines while he was at the Salk Institute in 1988. His research was continued at Vical in 1989, where the first in-vivo mammalian experiments were designed by him. Between 1988 and 1989, the doctor wrote the patent disclosures for mRNA vaccines.

Well, why should  we trust him instead of a hack like Fauci? 

Woodcuts like no others …

… Nigeness: Helen Frankenthaler: Radical Beauty.

In case you wondered …

… Yes, it’s his most famous quotation, but who really said it?

Something to think on …

America — it is a fabulous country, the only fabulous country; it is the only place where miracles not only happen, but where they happen all the time.
— Thomas Wolfe, born on this date in 1900

Word of the Day …

… Kine | Word Genius.

Saturday, October 02, 2021

One fine author on another …

… Miscellaneous Musings : Francine Prose on reading Charles Dickens.

Heartbreak …

… Zealotry of Guerin: Poetry and Fiction by Christopher Guerin: The Flowered Dress (Edouard Vuillard), Sonnet #582.

Haunting …

… Robert Francis - Eratosphere. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Horse sense

… After Being Fired By Biden, Radicalized Horses Storm Capitol Shouting 'Trump Won!' | The Babylon Bee.

Anniversary …

… The American Pageant: Not an empty escape into the twilight zone begins in 1959.

A close look at a close reader …

… Christopher Ricks: the artful noticer - Prospect Magazine. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Allusive and playful, Ricks corrects easy critical assumptions in ways that would entertain any literature lover.
[In] another essay re-composed from a lecture, “TS Eliot and ‘Wrong’d Othello”’ …  he analyses Eliot’s notorious claim that, in his sonorous final monologue, Shakespeare’s Othello is “cheering himself up” (the italics are Eliot’s). Ricks shows you what perhaps you had heard but did not really see before—how Eliot’s criticism takes on the phrasing and diction of what he criticises. Far from distancing himself from Othello, Eliot is deeply involved in his words and thoughts. Suddenly you see that lines in The Waste Land that you have read a hundred times echo this marital tragedy. Eliot meets Shakespeare in a net of quotations and allusions

Something to think on …

It is not everyday that the world arranges itself into a poem.
— Wallace Stevens, born on this date in 1879

Word of the Day …

 Athwart | Word Genius.

Goethe - Part II

 

I surprised myself earlier this year when I read -- and enjoyed -- the first part of Goethe's Faust. That part, which contains the famous 'bargain,' I was able to follow. And as I say, there were parts which I even enjoyed.

Sadly, I struggled to make my way through part two. There's a lot happening here, clearly; but without the necessarily background and training, I found it a challenge to connect each of the five acts, and to understand how Faust himself fit in. The references -- both implicit and explicit -- to Greek drama, too, seem largely to have been lost on me. 

All of that said, there are some beautiful passages in the second part -- most of them, in my reading, unfurling with a sort of organic quality. No doubt, Goethe's language is sweeping, his sense of rhythm and meter highly attuned. And so while I can't claim that I followed the intricacies of the plot or cultural references in part two, I can say that some of this poetry, at least, will stay with me.

Have you wishes without number?
Watch the promise of the dawn!
Lightly you are wrapped in slumber:
Shed this husk and be reborn!
Venture boldly; hesitation
Is for lesser men -- when deeds
Are a noble mind's creation, 
All his enterprise succeeds.